Manar Alalfi

Ryerson University / Queen's University

Dr. Alalfi is an Assistant Professor at Ryerson’s Computer Science Department and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Queen’s School of Computing, Software Technology Lab, Canada. She received her PhD from Queen’s in 2010 where she was honored with the Queen’s School of Computing research achievement award for her PhD thesis work: A verification framework for access control in web applications. Her PhD work was awarded the Google Community award in 2008. 

Dr. Alalfi is specialized in software engineering and its synergy with diverse research areas including: Data Analytics, Model Driven Engineering (MDE) for Web applications Security Analysis, MDE for Automotive Systems, Scientific Software Engineering, and Mining Software Repositories (MSR). Dr. Alalfi is a professional member of the ACM and IEEE Computer Society.

Rob Blanchard Photo UNB

Dima Alhadidi

University of New Brunswick

Dima Alhadidi is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Computer Science at the University of New Brunswick and a research scientist at the Canadian Institute for Cybersecurity. She received her PhD degree in Computer Science and Software Engineering from Concordia University. Before joining the University of New Brunswick, she was an assistant professor at Zayed University and a research associate at Concordia University. Her research interests include computer security, privacy protection, aspect-oriented programming, software engineering, secure distributed computing, cloud computing, healthcare informatics, and privacy-preserving machine learning.

Julien Bois

Cité Collégiale

Julien Bois is a cybersecurity professional specializing in Identity and Access Management (GIA) architecture. He has worked for more than 12 years for large organizations in France, India, Quebec and Ontario, such as Société Générale, BNP Paribas, Mouvement des Caisses Desjardins, Laurentian Bank, Université de Montréal, the Agence Revenue Canada, Shared Services Canada and the Bank of Canada. Registered as an engineer in Ontario (PEO) and France (IESF), he also holds specialized certifications such as CISSP-ISSAP, CISA, CISM, CEH, CASP, AWS Certified Solutions Architect and PMP. He teaches ethics and the management of security systems in the cybersecurity program at Cité Collégiale. He is the volunteer director of ISACA, responsible for Academic Relations for the Ottawa Chapter. 

David Barrera

Polytechnique Montréal

David Barrera is an assistant professor in the computer and software engineering department at Polytechnique Montréal. He was previously a visiting scientist at IBM Research in Zürich and a postdoctoral researcher in the Network Security Group at ETH Zürich. After obtaining his Ph.D. from Carleton University he has continued working on computer and network security problems that affect experts and end users alike. His current research focus is to propose network and operating system solutions to improve the security of the Internet of Things. 

Website

Karim Benyekhlef

Université de Montréal

Dr. Karim Benyekhlef is a Professor in the Faculty of Law at Université de Montréal and the Lexum Chair of Legal Information. He is also a researcher at the Centre de Recherche en Droit Public (CRDC) and an associate member of the Institut des hautes recherches sur la justice (Paris). His field of expertise for teaching and research are constitutional law (human rights and freedoms), international law and information technology law, as well as the theory and history of law. Professor Benyekhlef was a catalyst for the development of the first online conflict resolution projects and oversees the Cyber justice Laboratory, which seeks to increase and facilitate access to justice. 

Website (French)

Martin Bouchard

Simon Fraser University

Dr. Martin Bouchard is a Professor at the School of Criminology and the Director of the International CyberCrime Research Centre (ICCRC) at Simon Fraser University. Dr. Bouchard received his Ph.D. in Criminology from University of Montreal, and completed postdoctoral work at the University of Maryland. His research specializes in the organization of illegal drug markets, and in research on criminal careers. His interest in cybercrime includes examining the structure of online criminal networks, as well as the role of the Internet in facilitating co-offending and criminal innovation.

Website 

Ryan Broll

University of Guelph

Dr. Ryan Broll is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. His research interests include cyberbullying and bullying, policing, victimization, and youth technology use. His most recent research has examined the ways in which adults prevent and respond to cyberbullying, the extent to which the general public is a security stakeholder in cyberspace, and the impact of violence on victims' social and emotional well-being. He is also interested in the public policy implications of sociological and criminal justice research.

Website

Riccardo Brun del Re

Algonquin College

Dr. Riccardo Brun del Re is a Project Manager at Algonquin College’s Office of Applied Research and Innovation. Previous to Algonquin, he was an innovation catalyst, a company founder and COO  (Advanced Bioelectric Corp.), and an inventor in the fields of bio-electrodes and human locomotion. He holds a Ph.D. in solid state physics.

Sonia Chiasson

Carleton University

Dr. Sonia Chiasson is the Canada Research Chair in Human Oriented Computer Security and an associate professor in the School of Computer Science at Carleton University. Her main research interests are in usable security: the intersection between human-computer interaction (HCI) and computer security. Her current projects are on user authentication, usable security for mobile devices, and improving end users' mental models of computer security, and collaborative security code reviews. Before moving to Ottawa, she was a full-time instructor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Saskatchewan and a member of the HCI Lab.

Web page

Jeremy Clark

Concordia University

Dr. Jeremy Clark is an Assistant Professor at the Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering. Previously, he was a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Canada Graduate Scholar at the University of Waterloo, where his Ph.D. on Democracy Enhancing technologies was awarded the university’s gold medal. His research interests include end-to-end verifiable voting systems, bitcoin, blockchain, fintech, Transport Layer Security (TLS) and the Certification Authority trust model, applied cryptography, and usable security.

Website

Mourad Debbabi

Concordia University

Dr. Mourad Debbabi is a Professor in the Institute for Information Systems Engineering at Concordia University and the Canada Research Chair in Information Systems Security. His main research interests are Cyber Forensics, Network and Software Security, Malware and Program Analysis, Software and Systems Engineering. Dr. Debbabi is also president of the National Forensics and Training Alliance (NCFTA) Canada. 

Website

David Décary-Hétu

Université de Montréal

Dr. David Décary-Hétu is an Assistant Professor in the International Centre for Comparative Criminology (ICCC) at Université de Montréal. His Ph.D. focused on three particular forms of crime, fraud on intellectual property, computer hacking, fraud on private and financial data. His research concerning online markets are on cryptomarket. His goals are to understand the structure of 2nd generation online illicit markets and their players. Dr. Décary-Hétu uses a quantitative approach based on big data, data mining and social network analysis. 

Website

Ron Deibert

University of Toronto

Ronald J. Deibert is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. The Citizen Lab undertakes interdisciplinary research at the intersection of global security, ICTs, and human rights.

Web page 

Benoît Dupont

Université de Montréal

info@serene-risc.ca

Dr. Benoît Dupont holds the Canada Research Chair for Security, Identity, and Technology, and also the Research Chair in Cybercrime Prevention, is a Professor at the School of Criminology at the Université de Montréal.

Benoît researches the organizational and technological aspects of changes in the public and private security sectors including identity theft, bank fraud, information pirating, telecommunications fraud, and emerging cyber security policies. Professor Dupont’s other research interests include governance of security, community policing, and public-private networks of security. He also has expertise in policing in Quebec and has co-authored several books on the subject. 

Web page

Khalil El-Khatib

University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Dr. Khalil El-Khatib is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Business and Information Technology at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. His research interests include biometrics, cloud computing, cyber-physical systems, e-health, feature interaction for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), IP telephony, personal and service mobility, Quality of Service (QoS) for multimedia applications, security and privacy issues in wireless sensor networks and in ad-hoc networks (MANET) as well as ubiquitous computing environment and smart cities.

Web page

Christopher Elliott

Algonquin College

Dr. Christopher Elliott is a part-time Professor in the Engineering Technology – Computer Science program at Algonquin College. As well, Dr. Elliott is a principal investigator who had led, managed, and delivered over 30 highly technical projects in collaboration with private sector clients. He started his career as a software programmer for A.C. Nielsen. He then worked as a software consultant for Ganz, a software designer and developer for GridPoint North, and a senior software developer at Fivesense Technologies Inc. where he currently works as a consultant on a wide range of projects.

Website

José Fernandez

Polytechnique Montréal

Dr. José Fernandez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Engineering at Polytechnique Montréal. His main research interests focus on malicious software (malware) and botnets, evaluation and testing of security products, RFID applications security, critical infrastructure control systems security (SCADA), intrusion detection systems (IDS), analysis and defense strategies against denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, cyber conflict and cyber warfare, trust management systems, privacy protection on Internet, as well as Computer Forensics and electronic evidence handling.

Website 

Francis Fortin

Université de Montréal

Dr. Francis Fortin is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology at Université de Montréal. His research focuses on the sexual exploitation of children on the Internet. Dr. Fortin is currently working on the treatment and the psychosocial adjustment of the sex offenders (GRAS), the civil and electronic disobedience, the use of data mining in the detection of spam, the variation of sexual preferences amongst consumers of child pornography, as well as the use of Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT).

Website (French)

Richard Frank

Simon Fraser University

Dr. Richard Frank is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University and the associate director of the International CyberCrime Research Centre (ICCRC). Dr. Frank’s main research interest is computational criminology. He analyzes the application of computer solutions to model or solve crime problems. Specifically he is interested in hackers and security issues, such as online terrorism and warfare. His research can be found in Criminology and Criminal Justice, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, and the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice. 

Website

Benjamin Fung

McGill University

Dr. Benjamin Fung is an Associate Professor of Information Studies (SIS) at McGill University and the Canada Research Chair in Data Mining for Cybersecurity. His main research interests are data mining, privacy protection, cyber forensics, services computing, and building engineering. He is also a co-curator with the World Economic Forum (WEF) and a Research Scientist in the National Cyber-Forensics and Training Alliance (NCFTA) Canada.

Website

Sébastien Gambs

Université de Québec à Montréal

Sébastien Gambs holds the Canada Research Chair in Privacy Analysis and Big Data Ethics since December 2017 and has been a professor in the Computer Science Department at the Université du Québec à Montreal (UQAM) since January 2016. Previously, he held a Research Chair in Joint Information Systems Security between the Université de Rennes 1 and Inria from September 2009 to December 2015. His main research interests focus on the protection of privacy in the digital world, with a particular focus on the issues of privacy in the context of geolocation. He has also contributed to privacy research in the following areas of application: social networks, distributed systems and identity management as well as privacy protection technologies in general.

Web page

Holly Ann Garnett

Royal Military College of Canada

Holly Ann Garnett is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario. Her research examines how electoral integrity can be strengthened throughout the electoral cycle, including the role of election management bodies, electoral assistance, voter registration, convenience voting measures, election technologies, civic literacy and campaign finance. She is a co-convener of the Electoral Management Network, and contributes to the Electoral Integrity Project. Holly Ann has been awarded a Killam Fellow at Cornell University (2009).  She was an Endeavour Research Fellow at The Australian National University (2017), a visiting fellow at the Åbo Akademi, Finland (2017), a visiting researcher at the University of Sydney (2014).

Website

Vincent Gautrais

Université de Montréal

Dr. Vincent Gautrais is a Professor in the Faculty of Law at Université de Montréal, as well as the Director of the Centre de Recherche en Droit Public (CRDP) and the Chair in Information Technology and E-Commerce Law. His main research interests are business law and information technology law. He has done research, written books and articles, and presented at conferences on Electronic Business Law, Electronic Contracts, Cyber-consumption, Network Security, Dispute Resolution by and for the Internet, Intellectual Property and Privacy. Prior to teaching at Université de Montréal, he was a Professor in the common law section at the University of Ottawa. 

Website (French)

Thomas J. Holt

Michigan State University

Thomas J. Holt is a professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University. His research focuses on cybercrime, cyberterrorism, policy responses to these phenomena and how the Internet play a facilitating role of crime and terror. Dr. Holt's research has been published in a range of journals including British Journal of Criminology, Criminology & Public Policy, and Terrorism & Political violence.  He is also the director of the International Interdisciplinary Research Consortium on Cybercrime (IIRCC), a global association of scholars focused on cybercrime and cybersecurity issues.  

Laura Huey

University of Western Ontario

Dr. Laura Huey is a Professor of Sociology, the Director of the Canadian Society of Evidence Based Policing, a member of the Council of Canadian Academies' Expert Panel on the Future of Policing Models, an academic member of SERENE-RISC, and a Senior Researcher and University Representative for the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society. Her areas of research include policing, cyber-policing, terrorism in online environments and victimization.

Jason Jaskolka

Carleton University

Dr. Jason Jaskolka is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering at Carleton University. His research involves the formal specification, modelling, analysis, and verification of distributed multi-agent systems in an effort to develop design patterns that can be applied to build cybersecurity into the designs of such systems.
Before joining Carleton University, he was a U.S. Department of Homeland Security Cybersecurity Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University within the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) where he worked on the project titled "Cybersecurity Assurance For Critical Infrastructure" 

Website

Pierre Jolicoeur

Royal Military College of Canada

Dr. Pierre Jolicoeur is a Professor of Political Science at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) and the Acting Head of the Department of Politics and Economics. He is mainly teaching courses on International Relations and Strategic Studies. His theoretical works focus on secessionism, federalism, ethnic conflicts and conflict resolution. Dr. Jolicoeur is also a specialist of the Caucasus and the South Eastern Europe.

 Website 

Scott Knight

Royal Military College of Canada

Dr. Scott Knight is an Associate Professor and Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Royal Military College of Canada. His research interests in software engineering are computer, network security, object-oriented analysis, and design. Dr. Knight is teaching or has taught Cyber Defence, Programming Languages, Distributed Applications, and Computer Design. 

Website

Arash Habibi Lashkari

University of New Brunswick

Dr. Arash Habibi Lashkari is an assistant professor at the Faculty of Computer Science, University of New Brunswick (UNB) and research manager of the Canadian Institute for Cybersecurity (CIC). He has more than 22 years of academic and industry experience developing technology that detects and protects against cyberattacks, malware and the dark web. Dr. Lashkari has been awarded 3 gold medals as well as 12 silver and bronze medals in international computer security competitions around the world. In 2017, he has been selected as the top 150 researchers who will shape the future of Canada. Also, he won the Runner up Cybersecurity Academic Award of the year at ICSIC conference in Canada. He is the author of 10 books in English and Persian on topics including cryptography, network security, and mobile communication as well as over 80 journals and conference papers concerning various aspects of computer security. His research focuses on cybersecurity, big data security analysis, Internet Traffic Analysis and the detection of malware and cyber attacks as well as producing one the biggest cybersecurity datasets in the world. Currently he is working on three projects namely Honeynet, network traffic analyzer netflowmeter and Android Sandbox.

 Web page

 

Sylvain Leblanc

Royal Military College of Canada

Dr. Sylvain (Sly) Leblanc is an Associate Professor at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). He is a primary investigator in RMCC’s Computer Security Laboratory with research interests in the areas of computer and network security, as well as cyber operations. Previously, Sly was a soldier for over 20 years, serving in the Canadian Army as a communications and electronics engineering officer in the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals.

Web page

Victoria Lemieux

University of British Columbia

Victoria Lemieux is Associate Professor of Archival Science at the University of British Columbia, and founder and lead of the Blockchain@UBC research and education cluster. Her research focuses on risk to the availability of trustworthy records and how these risks impact upon transparency, financial stability, public accountability and human rights. She holds a doctorate from University College London (Archival Studies, 2002), and, since 2005, has been a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP). She is also the winner of the 2015 Emmett Leahy Award for outstanding contributions to the field of records management, a 2015 World Bank Big Data Innovation Award, and a 2016 Emerald Literati Award for her research on blockchain technology.

Christian Leuprecht

Royal Military College of Canada

Dr. Christian Leuprecht is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Royal Military College of Canada. Dr. Leuprecht’s research priorities include national security and defence policy, political violence/terrorism, the political, economic, security, social and cultural implications of demographic change, horizon scanning of emerging security threats, civil-military relations, federalism and intergovernmental relations, dynamics of ethno-national conflict, and comparative constitutional politics.

Website

Luigi Logrippo

Université du Québec en Outaouais

Dr. Luigi Logrippo is a Professor in the Department of Computer and Engineering at Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO). His main research interests are formal methods with application to software design in communication protocols, security and access control, advanced functionalities in Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), feature interaction, electronic commerce, normative systems, and their logical analysis. 

Website (French)

Hugo Loiseau

Université de Sherbrooke

Dr. Hugo Loiseau is a Professor of Political Science in the School of Applied Politics at the University of Sherbrooke and an expert in cybersecurity. He specializes in issues concerning public safety and privacy in Quebec and in Canada. He published several scientific articles and chapters of books on geopolitics in the cyberspace as well as the international governance of cyberattacks such as « La cybersécurité au Canada : une posture de défense pro-active » in the periodical Diplomatie, Géopolitique du Cyberespace.

Website (French)

Stephen Marsh

University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Dr. Stephen Marsh is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Business and Information Technology at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. His research mainly covers advanced collaborative environments, information flow, network secure management, people-oriented technologies, as well as trust and comfort. Dr. Marsh’s research is concerned with the adaptation and adoption of human values and skills to advanced information communication technologies.

Website

Florian Martin-Bariteau

University of Ottawa

Dr. Florian Martin-Bariteau is an Assistant Professor of Law and Technology at the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section and Director of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society at the University of Ottawa. As a legal scholar, his research focuses on Intellectual Property and Technology Law; with a special interest for Trade-marks, Blockchain, Secrets and Whistleblowers.

Website

Atefeh Atty Mashatan

Ryerson University

Dr. Atefeh Mashatan is an Assistant Professor of Information Technology Management at Ryerson University. Prior to this position, she was a Senior Information Security Consultant and Solutions Architect at CIBC (Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce), 2012-2016, with a focus on cryptography and enterprise architecture where she led numerous solution design, implementation, and validation of strategic projects. Dr. Mashatan obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Waterloo, and her Certificate in University Teaching from the Centre for Teaching Excellence. She is a Certified Service Oriented Architect (SOA) with Honours. She obtained the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification from International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC2) in 2015.

Website

Ashraf Matrawy

Carleton University

Dr. Ashraf Matrawy is a Professor in the School of Information Technology at Carleton University. He leads the Next Generation Networks research group.  His main research interests are software defined networking, security of mobile networks, and security and privacy of the Internet of Things. He is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a licensed Professional Engineer in Ontario. Dr. Matrawy also served as a consultant in industry and for government departments.

Web page

Kevin McQuiggin

Simon Fraser University

Inspector Kevin McQuiggin is an Adjunct Professor at the International CyberCrime Research Centre (ICCRC) of Simon Fraser University. He is also in charge of the Forensics Services Section in the Vancouver Police Department. In 1995 as a member of the Coordinated Law Enforcement Unit (CLEU) he created the first "Internet Investigation Unit" in British Columbia and completed research papers for the provincial and the federal governments on the impact of technological crime upon policing in Canada.

Website

Bessma Momani

University of Waterloo

Dr. Bessma Momani is Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo and the Balsillie School of International Affairs. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for International Governance and Innovation (CIGI), Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Doha Center, and has been a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, a visiting scholar at Georgetown University's Mortara Center. She is a 2015 Fellow of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation and a Fulbright Scholar.

She has authored and co-edited over eight books and over 65 scholarly, peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters that have examined the IMF, the World Bank, petrodollars, the Middle East, and Arab youth. She is a recipient of a research grant funded by Canada's Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) to study IMF and World Bank cooperation. She was also the past recipient of SSHRC grants on the reform of the IMF executive board and on Middle East urbanization. Dr. Momani is a regular contributor to national and international media on the Arab Spring and global economic governance issues. She has written editorials for the New York Times, The Economist, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, The Ottawa Citizen, and many other reputable international newspapers.

Michele Mosca

University of Waterloo

Dr. Michele Mosca is a Professor at the University of Waterloo, as well as co-founder and Deputy Director of the Institute for Quantum Computing. He has made major contributions to the phase estimation approach to quantum algorithms, including the hidden subgroup problems, and quantum searching and counting. In the area of quantum security, he helped define the notion of private quantum channels and develop optimal methods for encrypting quantum information using classical keys. Dr. Mosca’s research interests include quantum algorithms and complexity, tools for optimizing the implementation of quantum circuits, and the development of cryptographic tools that will be safe against quantum technology. 

Website

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Stephen Neville

University of Victoria

Dr. Stephen Neville is an associate professor of Software Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Victoria. His primary research focuses on industry- and government- applied research in the areas of enterprise-scale cybersecurity and cyber privacy, software engineering and, particularly, software scalability issues, data analysis, cloud and high performance computing, including the cloud resource management, as well as wireless and machine-to-machine systems. The purpose of this research is to build “the tools and understanding necessary to quantitatively engineer the larger-scale software, and data analysis systems upon which modern societies are coming to depend upon.

Website

Karthik Pattabiraman

University of British Columbia

Dr. Karthik Pattabiraman is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver. He was awarded the NSERC Discovery Accelerator Supplement (DAS) in 2015, and the William Carter Award at DSN’08 the Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks. Dr. Pattabiraman initiated and led the Flikker project at Microsoft Research, which was one of the first papers in the field of what is now known as “approximate computing” or “good enough computing”. His main research interests are error resilient applications, web application reliability and smart devices security. 

Website

Mark Raymond

University of Oklahoma

Dr. Mark Raymond is an Assistant Professor of International Security in the Department of International and Area Studies at the University of Oklahoma. His research and teaching interests include International Relations theory, international law and organization, and international security. He is the co-editor of Organized Chaos: Reimagining the Internet (Waterloo, Canada: CIGI, 2014). His work has also appeared in the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs and the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal.

Website

Teresa Scassa

University of Ottawa

Dr. Teresa Scassa is a Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa and the Canada Research Chair in Information Law. Her current research projects include exploring legal issues relating to government-citizen interaction in the geoweb, smart cities, open government and open data, and the platform economy. Dr. Scassa is a past member of both the External Advisory Committee of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, and the Canadian Government Advisory Committee on Open Government. 

Web page

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David Skillicorn

Queen's University

Dr. David Skillicorn is a Professor in the School of Computing at Queen’s University. He is also an adjunct professor in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department of the Royal Military College. His research interests are in knowledge discovery in adversarial settings, particularly counterterrorism and law enforcement. He has also worked extensively in parallel and distributed computing.

Web page

Natalia Stakhanova

University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Natalia Stakhanova is an Associate Professor at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to joining UofS, she was the NB Innovation Research Chair in Cybersecurity at University of New Brunswick. Her work revolves around building secure
systems. Working closely with industry on a variety of R&D projects, she developed a number of technologies that resulted in 3 patents in the field of computer security and have been adopted by high-tech companies. Natalia Stakhanova is the recipient of the UNB Merit Award, the McCain Young Scholar Award and the Anita Borg Institute Faculty Award. She is a strong advocate of Women in IT and co-founder of CyberLaunch Academy, an initiative that aims to promote science and technology among children.

May 19, 2016; Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Douglas Stebila - Computing and Software, Faculty of Engineering, McMaster University. Photo by Ron Scheffler for McMaster University.

Douglas Stebila

University of Waterloo

Dr. Douglas Stebila is an Assistant Professor in cryptography at University of Waterloo.  His research focuses on improving the security of Internet cryptography protocols such as Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS) and Secure Shell (SSH) and developing practical quantum-resistant cryptosystems.  His broad research interests include applied cryptography and Internet security.  He has written about key exchange protocols, digital signatures, and public key infrastructure, as well as Internet protocols such as the Network Time Protocol and Certificate Transparency.

Web page

Natasha Tusikov

York University

Dr. Natasha Tusikov is an assistant professor in the Criminology Program of the Department of Social Science at York University in Toronto. Her research examines the intersection among law, crime, technology, and regulation. She is particularly interested in exploring regulation by Internet intermediaries and data governance relating to the Internet of Things and smart cities. She is the author of Chokepoints: Global Private Regulation on the Internet (University of California Press, 2017). Before obtaining her PhD at the Australian National University, she was a strategic criminal intelligence analyst and researcher at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Ottawa.

Vivek Venkatesh

Concordia University

(Photo credit: Thomas Mazerolles)

Dr. Vivek Venkatesh is an Associate Professor in the Department of Education at Concordia University. He is the director of the SOMEONE - Social Media Education Every Day initiative, and the creator of the Grimposium festival and conference series. Vivek is a filmmaker, and an interdisciplinary, applied learning scientist who investigates the psychological, cultural and cognitive factors impacting the design, development and inclusive adoption of digital media in educational and social contexts.

Web page

Nicolas Vermeys

Université de Montréal

Dr. Nicolas Vermeys is a Professor in the Faculty of Law at Université de Montréal and a researcher at the Centre de recherche en droit public (CRDP). He is also the associate director of the Cyberjustice Laboratory. Dr. Vermeys’ research focuses on legal issues pertaining to information security, developments in the field of Cyber justice, and other questions relating to the impact of technological innovations on the law. He is often invited to speak on these topics by the media, and regularly lectures for judges, lawyers, professional orders, and government organizations, in Canada and abroad.

Website (French)

Natalija Vlajic

York University

Natalija Vlajic is an Associate Professor at the Lassonde School of Engineering, York University. The main areas of her research include: user privacy and anonymity, DDoS, Internet bots and botnets, network and application-layer security, IoT security, machine learning. Prof. Vlajic has co-authored numerous journal and conference articles on a range of topic pertaining to computer security and privacy. She currently serves as an Associate Editor of IEEE Communication Magazine.

Website

Alex Zahavich

SAIT Polytechnic

Dr. Alex Zahavich is a Professor and the Vice President of Corporate Development and Applied Research at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) Polytechnic. His field of expertise is Mechanical Engineering and his Doctorate of Philosophy was focused on plastics recycling. Dr. Zahavich has been with SAIT since 2001 and amongst other things, he designed and developed with his team of researchers, skeleton sleds for John Fairbairn and Eric Neilson, who raced on the SAIT-made equipment at the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

Nur Zincir-Heywood

Dalhousie University

Nur Zincir-Heywood is a Professor of Computer Science at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. Her research interests include computational intelligence and data analytics for network operations and cyber security. She currently works on traffic and behavior analysis for network / service management and cyber-security. She has substantial experience of industrial research in systems security and computer networking. Dr. Zincir-Heywood is a member of the IEEE and the ACM.

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